The Squishiness of Cancer Cells

From UCLA

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Something squishy

A misshapen nucleus is bad news. For any given cell type, the nucleus – the home of most of a cell’s genetic material – generally takes a fairly consistent shape. But when things go wrong and disease takes hold, the nucleus can become deformed.

Professor Amy Rowat from UCLA explains how an enlarged nucleus can be used as a biomarker for cancer. A telltale sign of something gone awry. Corrupted cells with cancerous leanings take on a different texture to healthy cells. They are softer and more malleable, or, as Professor Rowat puts it, more "squishy".

Here we see how, using tiny technology, this change in cellular flexibility can be used to diagnose disease, and could one day help determine which treatments might be most suitable for each patient.

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Being Human

Details

Type:
Documentary
Location:
California, USA
Published:
2014
Filmed:
2014
Credits:

Professor Amy Rowat / UCLA

Licence: Standard YouTube License

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